THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON December 13, 2017 @ 6:31 am
Avalanche Advisory published on December 12, 2017 @ 6:31 am
Issued by Jeff Thompson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets

bottom line

Not a lot has changed with the weather or snowpack since the last advisory. The good news is... most area have a firm base of snow to help limit the amount of basal rotting that's typical during long spells of high pressure. The bad news is... the upper portion of the pack has 2 distinct weak layers and is not supportive enough to receive more snow on top of it.

How to read the advisory

Selkirks/Cabinets

How to read the advisory

Not a lot has changed with the weather or snowpack since the last advisory. The good news is... most area have a firm base of snow to help limit the amount of basal rotting that's typical during long spells of high pressure. The bad news is... the upper portion of the pack has 2 distinct weak layers and is not supportive enough to receive more snow on top of it.

1. Low

?

Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Dry
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    Certain
    Very Likely
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Loose snow avalanches remain the primary concern for avalanches. You can mitigate this concern by staying off of slopes steeper that 35 degrees.

Avalanche Problem 2: Loose Wet
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  • Aspect/Elevation ?
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    Certain
    Very Likely
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    Very Large
    Large
    Small

The region has seen unseasonably warm temperatures over the past couple of days which has increased the surface melting on solar aspects. The melting on the surface has increased the the amount of water percolating in to the snowpack which makes solar aspects more susceptible to loose wet avalanches.

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

A big ridge over the pacific is pushing cold air far south and north around the forecast area. We continue to sit in a high pressure for the next couple days. Places like Corpus Christy, TX and Baltimore, MD are seeing more snow than anywhere in ID, UT, CA, CO or AK. Watch for a possible break up of that ridge by this weekend. Increased chances for precipitation will follow the break up of that ridge.

Weather observations from the Region
0600 temperature: 21 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 39 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: NE
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 8-10 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 14 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 0 inches
Total snow depth: inches
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Spokane NWS
For 2000 ft. to 4000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Mostly cloudy / chance for sun Mostly cloudy Mostly cloudy
Temperatures: 32 deg. F. 21 deg. F. 33 deg. F.
Wind Direction: S NE NE
Wind Speed: 3-5 3-5 2-6
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
For 4000 ft. to 6000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Partly sunny Partly sunny Partly sunny
Temperatures: 36 deg. F. 20 deg. F. 36 deg. F.
Wind Direction: NE NE NE
Wind Speed: 3-5 3-5 6-8
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.