THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 18, 2017 @ 7:37 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 17, 2017 @ 7:37 am
Issued by Jeff Thompson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets

bottom line

Even though we've seen a lot of rain in the snow pack at 6000', temperatures at night have been cold enough to keep the upper portions of the pack mostly frozen. Rain has percolated through the pack about 60-90cm down.  Temperatures in the mid 20's at night are helping keep the snow pack locked in place. If temps. warm up it could quickly become a different story. 

How to read the advisory


  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

Selkirks/Cabinets

How to read the advisory

2. Moderate

?

Above Treeline

2. Moderate

?

Near Treeline

1. Low

?

Below Treeline

Even though we've seen a lot of rain in the snow pack at 6000', temperatures at night have been cold enough to keep the upper portions of the pack mostly frozen. Rain has percolated through the pack about 60-90cm down.  Temperatures in the mid 20's at night are helping keep the snow pack locked in place. If temps. warm up it could quickly become a different story. 

  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
  • Character ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

The snow pack is dealing with all the recent rain pretty well but could become more unstable quickly if we receive more rain or warmer temperatures

Avalanche Problem 2: Deep Slab
  • Character ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.