THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 29, 2017 @ 5:05 pm
Avalanche Advisory published on March 28, 2017 @ 5:05 pm
Issued by Kevin Davis - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets

bottom line

With no major concerns for weak layers in the existing pack the thing to watch is the accumulation of new snow and wind.  The mountains have received about 3 inches of new snow in the last 24 hours and winds have loaded lee aspects more deeply.  Look for weak layers between changes in density.  More snow and wind forecast for tomorrow.

How to read the advisory


  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

Selkirks/Cabinets

How to read the advisory

2. Moderate

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Above Treeline

1. Low

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Near Treeline

1. Low

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Below Treeline

With no major concerns for weak layers in the existing pack the thing to watch is the accumulation of new snow and wind.  The mountains have received about 3 inches of new snow in the last 24 hours and winds have loaded lee aspects more deeply.  Look for weak layers between changes in density.  More snow and wind forecast for tomorrow.

  • Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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Wind will be stiff out of the SW tonight and into tomorrow.  This will load up lee aspects with enough snow to create deeper pockets you'll want to be alert to.  Day to night changes in temp could have denser layers lying over lighter layers of snow and this weak layering could be worsened by wind loading.  Test steep, windloaded terrain before committing.  

Avalanche Problem 2: Loose Wet
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Loose wet slides could become troublesome at mid and low elevations when temperatures exceed 32 degrees.  Steep terrain below treeline will be the places to watch.  If you're in up to your boot tops or laying on the throttle to move through slush its time to get off the steep stuff to avaoid wet slides.

advisory discussion

We're close to a spring cycle with the temperatures.  We're just missing the sun part.  Until then, be cautious of new snow accumulations especially when wind loaded.  Rain is always bad for the stability.  We don't have any plaguing weak layers but rain can collect on firmer layers in the pack and lubricate the slab above.  Be on your toes.  

CURRENT CONDITIONS Weather observations from the Region
0600 temperature: 24 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 33 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: NNE
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 20 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 47 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 3 inches
Total snow depth: 119 inches
weather

Tonight there is a 90% chance of 1-3 inches of new snow.  Temperatures wil be in the high 20s and winds will be SW at 13-16mph with gusts to 25.  Wednesday there is 100% chance of 2-4 inches of new snow.  Daytime temperatures will rise to 33 and winds will remain SW at 11-16 gusting to 25.  Thursday there is a 40% chance of one inch of new snow.  Temperatures in the low 30s and winds changing to NW at 6-8mph.

Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.