THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON April 4, 2018 @ 6:52 am
Avalanche Advisory published on April 3, 2018 @ 6:52 am
Issued by Melissa Hendrickson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

bottom line

April SNOW showers! Wind slabs continue to be the main concern at the higher elevation ridges.  The new snow that we've been getting has been accompanied by transport speed winds. The small storms with winds trend will continue this week, creating layered wind slabs.  Look for signs of windloading in the areas you are travelling.  

How to read the advisory

St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

How to read the advisory

April SNOW showers! Wind slabs continue to be the main concern at the higher elevation ridges.  The new snow that we've been getting has been accompanied by transport speed winds. The small storms with winds trend will continue this week, creating layered wind slabs.  Look for signs of windloading in the areas you are travelling.  

2. Moderate

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Above Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

2. Moderate

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Near Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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Variable wind directions and speeds have created wind slabs along the ridges and mountain tops.  Watch for crossloading on terrain features that provide a break in the slope.  Look for smooth, rounded pillows of snow and cracking when you are travelling in safe terrain. 

Avalanche Problem 2: Storm Slab
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Melt freeze cycles from sunny days last week have left a smooth sliding surface in a lot of places for the new storm deposits.  Check how well the new snow has bonded to the crust in the locations you are planning on riding and sliding.  

recent observations

This is our last Tuesday forecast for the season.  Thank you to all those folks that helped with observations over the season.  We have a substantial snowpack still with potentially up to a foot more coming this week; full on spring conditions have not hit us yet.  Stay safe for the rest of the season; use sound decision making and appropriate caution when travelling in avalanche terrain.  

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
Weather observations from the Region
0600 temperature: 19 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 23 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: SW
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 9 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 23 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 4-6 inches
Total snow depth: 79 inches
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Spokane NWS
For 2000 ft. to 4000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Mostly Cloudy Slight Chance Snow Snow then Rain/Snow
Temperatures: 40 deg. F. 32 deg. F. 40 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SW S S
Wind Speed: 8-10 7 7
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 1 in.
For 4000 ft. to 6000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Slight Chance Snow Showers Chance Snow Showers Snow
Temperatures: 29 deg. F. 23 deg. F. 32 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SW SW SW
Wind Speed: 13-15 10-13 10
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 1 in. 2-4 in.
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.