Use this page to view archived advisories. The table below shows the overall danger rating and the bottom line for the 20 most recent advisories. Click on the time and date link above each danger rating icon to view the full advisory for that day. Use the date chooser or the pager at the bottom to scroll through the older advisories.

E.g., Thursday, September 20, 2018
E.g., Thursday, September 20, 2018
E.g., Thursday, September 20, 2018
Date the advisory was published:sort descending
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-02-06
February 6, 2017 at 15:50

High avalanche danger exists across the forecast area. Travel in avalanche terrain is not recommended.  Stay  off slopes steeper than 30 degrees above the 4,000 foot elevation.  

 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-02-06
February 6, 2017 at 15:50

High avalanche danger exists across the forecast area. Travel in avalanche terrain is not recommended.  Stay  off slopes steeper than 30 degrees above the 4,000 foot elevation.  

 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-03
March 3, 2017 at 7:00

In the Cabinet Mountains near Lunch peak we found 9 feet of snow with calm winds and below freezing temperatures.  Above the thick icecrust formed 3 weeks ago, we have received 3 feet of low density fluff with the top 3 inches starting to slab up from the recent winds since Wednesday.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-03
March 3, 2017 at 11:32

In the Bitteroots near Lookout Pass we have 3 feet recent storm snow which has a decent bond to the 8 inch icecrust from 3 weeks ago with some instability within the top 3 feet of storm snow due minor snow density changes between these storms.  Things are starting to consolidate.  The upper few inches of snow have some wind affect in most areas with more on steep exposed upper elevations.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-03
March 3, 2017 at 11:32

In the Bitteroots near Lookout Pass we have 3 feet recent storm snow which has a decent bond to the 8 inch icecrust from 3 weeks ago with some instability within the top 3 feet of storm snow due minor snow density changes between these storms.  Things are starting to consolidate.  The upper few inches of snow have some wind affect in most areas with more on steep exposed upper elevations.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-07
March 7, 2017 at 13:18

MODERATE avalanche danger today for mid and upper elevations for the entire forecast region with isolated areas of considerable in steep exposed terrain near ridgetops on windloaded aspects N, NE, E.  With increase in wind, snow and temperatures watch for heavier snow on lighter snow in the upcoming storms producing 1.5 feet of new storm snow weak layers.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-07
March 7, 2017 at 13:18

MODERATE avalanche danger today for mid and upper elevations for the entire forecast region with isolated areas of considerable in steep exposed terrain near ridgetops on windloaded aspects N, NE, E.  With increase in wind, snow and temperatures watch for heavier snow on lighter snow in the upcoming storms producing 1.5 feet of new storm snow weak layers.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-10
March 10, 2017 at 7:02

We've received about 1 foot of snow on the level since last week and steady westerly winds have piled it up even deeper on lee aspects.  Warming temperatures with the most recent accumulation of several inches last night will have created an unstable situation at the surface, particularly in those wind-loaded areas.  Touching off a small slab in steep terrain could step down to lower layers.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-10
March 10, 2017 at 7:20

Melissa and MIiles found about 110cm of new snow since the rain 3 weeks ago. So far, it has all landed right side up and settling. Snowfall yesterday was already beginning to get denser as they were headed out.  Concerns are windslabs in the N-NE-E aspects near and above treeline and the recent storm slabs.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-14
March 14, 2017 at 20:22
Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-14
March 14, 2017 at 20:22
Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-17
March 17, 2017 at 7:37

Even though we've seen a lot of rain in the snow pack at 6000', temperatures at night have been cold enough to keep the upper portions of the pack mostly frozen. Rain has percolated through the pack about 60-90cm down.  Temperatures in the mid 20's at night are helping keep the snow pack locked in place. If temps. warm up it could quickly become a different story. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-17
March 17, 2017 at 7:53

Mid 20 temperatures at night have helped the avalanche danger. The snow pack is just barely seeing cold enough nights to keep it in place. Look for a weaker snow pack to develop quickly when temps warm up.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-22
March 22, 2017 at 9:24
Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-22
March 22, 2017 at 9:24
Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-24
March 24, 2017 at 7:08

Avalanche hazard is being held in check by the melt/freeze conditions from the last few days and nights.  The pack is isothermal and there are no serious lingering weak layers in the upper 3 feet above the thick crust.  New snow and warming temperatures will be your main concern later today and this weekend.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-24
March 24, 2017 at 7:38

Currently Crust on Surface with warming temps and snow today which could lead to loose wet slides on steeper terrain over 32 degrees on all aspects.  Avalanche hazard is being held in check by the melt/freeze conditions from the last few days and nights.  The pack is isothermal and there are no serious lingering weak layers in the upper 3 feet above the thick crust.  New snow and warming temperatures will be your main concern later today and this weekend.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-28
March 28, 2017 at 17:05

With no major concerns for weak layers in the existing pack the thing to watch is the accumulation of new snow and wind.  The mountains have received about 3 inches of new snow in the last 24 hours and winds have loaded lee aspects more deeply.  Look for weak layers between changes in density.  More snow and wind forecast for tomorrow.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-28
March 28, 2017 at 17:24

Temperatures are on the warm side and new snow is accumulating with westerly winds.  Watch wind loading on lee aspects.  Weak layers may form as changes in density new snow.  The pack may be getting a little rotten and that increases your chances of setting off loose wet sloughs. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-31
March 31, 2017 at 7:05

Welcome to Spring! The snowpack in the Selkirks and Cabinets has gone isothermic. If we see an increase in temperature there could be an increased avalanche danger but right now overnight temperatures are cold enough to keep snow from moving.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-31
March 31, 2017 at 7:22

The snowpack has gone isothermic. That means the temperature outside will be a good indicator for figuring out the avalanche danger. Right now freezing temperatures over night are keeping the avalanche danger low. An increase in temperature could increase instabilities. For now, enjoy the spring riding!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-03-31
March 31, 2017 at 7:22

The snowpack has gone isothermic. That means the temperature outside will be a good indicator for figuring out the avalanche danger. Right now freezing temperatures over night are keeping the avalanche danger low. An increase in temperature could increase instabilities. For now, enjoy the spring riding!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-05
April 5, 2017 at 8:20

I was sure nice to see the sunshine yesterday! I dug a snowpit yesterday north of Schweitzer mountain in the Selkirks (6200ft). There is 30-40cm crust near the surface that is very supportive. I don't see the avalanche danger increasing until that thick crust gets broken down. Rain and warm temperatures might try to break down the crust layer but my feeling is that overnight temperatures will be cold enough to keep it intact for the extent of this forecast.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-05
April 5, 2017 at 8:20

I was sure nice to see the sunshine yesterday! I dug a snowpit yesterday north of Schweitzer mountain in the Selkirks (6200ft). There is 30-40cm crust near the surface that is very supportive. I don't see the avalanche danger increasing until that thick crust gets broken down. Rain and warm temperatures might try to break down the crust layer but my feeling is that overnight temperatures will be cold enough to keep it intact for the extent of this forecast.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-07
April 7, 2017 at 7:23

The rain and warm temperatures have made an effect on the snowpack. Yesterday in the Cabinet mountains, we found the supportive crust near the surface layer mostly gone.  Skier and snowmobiler triggered slides are unlikely but natural wet slides are possible. We did see a wet slide (D2) yesterday that covered the Tressle ck. road. The more unsupportable the snow the greater chance of seeing some avalanche activity.

 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-07
April 7, 2017 at 7:34

The supportive crust near the surface of the snowpack is breaking down quickly with the warm temperatures and rain. The rain percolating through the snowpack will break down some of the strength. Expect to see unsupportable snow in the backcountry. Human triggered avalanches are still unlikely but possible. Natural avalanches are a possibility especially on steep slopes with a smooth bed surface. Safe travels!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-11
April 11, 2017 at 13:55

With todays sun and warm temperatures the avalanche danger is on the rise. Be aware of wet / loose avalanche activity, especially on solar aspects. Enjoy the sunshine!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-11
April 11, 2017 at 14:04

I hope you're all out enjoying the sunshine! The avalanche danger is on the rise while the sun is out. With these warm temperatures and solar radiation be aware of the possibility of wet avalanches.  Solar aspects will be the most likely spot to find unstable snow. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-14
April 14, 2017 at 7:59

 This will be the last advisory of the season. Check out our Facebook site later this afternoon for some spring snow tips! Thanks for following us this season and look forward to bringing you all more avalanche information next winter. Have a good summer!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-14
April 14, 2017 at 7:59

 This will be the last advisory of the season. Check out our Facebook site later this afternoon for some spring snow tips! Thanks for following us this season and look forward to bringing you all more avalanche information next winter. Have a good summer!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-25
April 25, 2017 at 10:28

Thank you to everyone who helped IPAC withour mission to provide avalanche education and post weekly avalanche advisories for the public.  This year was one to remember with many great days in the mountains.  There are still good times to be had so check out the Education page for Spring Touring/Riding Tips.  Cheers!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-04-25
April 25, 2017 at 10:28

Thank you to everyone who helped IPAC withour mission to provide avalanche education and post weekly avalanche advisories for the public.  This year was one to remember with many great days in the mountains.  There are still good times to be had so check out the Education page for Spring Touring/Riding Tips.  Cheers!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-11-01
November 1, 2017 at 10:48

The NWS has issued a Winter Storm Watch for the northern portion of the Idaho Panhandle.  Expect a cold front to bring heavy snowfall from Wednesday evening through Friday morning.  Avalanche hazards could exist in high elevation avalanche start zones, especially on northerly aspects.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-11-01
November 1, 2017 at 10:48

The NWS has issued a Winter Storm Watch for the northern portion of the Idaho Panhandle.  Expect a cold front to bring heavy snowfall from Wednesday evening through Friday morning.  Avalanche hazards could exist in high elevation avalanche start zones, especially on northerly aspects.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-08
December 8, 2017 at 6:16

It's been at least 2 weeks since the Cabinet or Selkirk mountians have seen any new snowfall. The recent high presusure and colder temperatures have started to break down the snowpack (near surface faceting). In most areas the snowpack can be summed up in 2 parts. The bottom half of the pack is old firm frozen snow and the upper portions of the pack is light unconsolidated snow. In it's current state the snowpack doesn't present much avalanche danger. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-08
December 8, 2017 at 6:51

Rain and warm temperatures over Thanksgiving had a toll on the depth of our snowpack. The newer snow is fairly well bonded to the Thanksgiving crust, but small windloaded pockets were observed on all aspectsSurface hoar and near surface faceting was also observed.  Looking ahead at the weather forecast, no new precipitation is expected for a while and daytime highs over the weekend could form sun crusts.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-12
December 12, 2017 at 6:31

Not a lot has changed with the weather or snowpack since the last advisory. The good news is... most area have a firm base of snow to help limit the amount of basal rotting that's typical during long spells of high pressure. The bad news is... the upper portion of the pack has 2 distinct weak layers and is not supportive enough to receive more snow on top of it.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-12
December 12, 2017 at 7:19

The snow trends in the mountains are currently being driven by the inversion.  Large surface hoar was found on all aspects below 5100' , with smaller hoar found at higher elevations.  Near surface faceting found on all aspects. The pack hasn't changed much since Thursday with some melt freeze crusts forming on the southern aspects at higher elevations.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-15
December 15, 2017 at 6:32

We have received only a trace of snow this week with contnued cold weather, with more surface faceting and isolated areas of large surface hoar buildup in frost pockets sheltered from the sun and wind. The avalanche danger is rated LOW on all slopes with generally safe riding conditions other than the thin snowpack with many obstacles.   HOWEVER......Heads up through the weekend with snow on the way covering weak facets and surface hoar abroad!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-15
December 15, 2017 at 6:32

We have received only a trace of snow this week with contnued cold weather, with more surface faceting and isolated areas of large surface hoar buildup in frost pockets sheltered from the sun and wind. The avalanche danger is rated LOW on all slopes with generally safe riding conditions other than the thin snowpack with many obstacles.   HOWEVER......Heads up through the weekend with snow on the way covering weak facets and surface hoar abroad!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-19
December 19, 2017 at 6:17

A major winter storm has arrived and is dropping a large amount of snow on a very weak snowpack. Expect to see wide spread avalanche activity in the backcountry for the next 24 hours. We could see snow today falling at a rate of 1-2'' an hour with totals approaching a meter in higher elevations.  Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route finding and conservative decision making will be essential.  Human triggered avalanches are likely on slopes above 30 degrees. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-19
December 19, 2017 at 6:51

Heavy snowfall has been and is currently falling on our weak snowpack and will continue through the advisory period with snowfall rates up to 1" to 2" an hour. Avalanche activity is expected to increase during the advisory period.  Windloading has occurred from the N-SE aspects, with extensive windslabs observed at the higher elevations.  Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision making are essential in the backcountry today. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-21
December 21, 2017 at 17:13

Steady snow accumulation has been the rule for the past week but the 36 hour dump from Sunday night to Wednesday is what tipped the scales.  We have two feet of unstable snowpack on top of the Thanksgiving crust and the most sensitive layer is within the 36 hour storm snow.  You'll find it about 1.5 feet deep in soft new snow.  It will take a little longer to become stable, especially in steep terrain.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-22
December 22, 2017 at 6:49

This weeks storms dumped 25 to 30 inches of snow, now burying the surface hoar and faceting that had developed on top of the Thanksgiving crust.  This is providing an unstable layer underneath all this new white that is a potential trigger point for avalanches on slopes >30.  This persistent weak layer will continue to be sensitive to triggers. Careful route finidng and conservative decision-making are essential for backcountry travel today.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-22
December 22, 2017 at 7:12

Steady snow accumulation has been the rule for the past week but the 36 hour dump from Sunday night to Wednesday is what tipped the scales.  We have two feet of unstable snowpack on top of the Thanksgiving crust and the most sensitive layer is within the 36 hour storm snow.  You'll find it about 1.5 feet deep in soft new snow.  It will take a little longer to become stable, especially in steep terrain.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-26
December 26, 2017 at 7:00

The cold temperatures over the Holiday Weekend didn't help the snowpack stabilize much; there is still a likelyhood of triggereing a persistent slab avalanche. Carefully assess the snowpack and allow for a large margin of error when choosing terrain.  New snow is expected tonight and tomorrow which will continue to stress the weak layers. Look for clues from the snowpack, shooting cracks, and localized collapsing.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-26
December 26, 2017 at 7:00

The cold temperatures over the Holiday Weekend didn't help the snowpack stabilize much; there is still a likelyhood of triggereing a persistent slab avalanche. Carefully assess the snowpack and allow for a large margin of error when choosing terrain.  New snow is expected tonight and tomorrow which will continue to stress the weak layers. Look for clues from the snowpack, shooting cracks, and localized collapsing.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-28
December 28, 2017 at 20:55

Red flags are evident with increasing and recent snowfall moderate to heavy, breezy and gusty winds, observed whumphing.  With the continued precipitation and warming temperatures expect more weight and strain our persistent weak layers 2-3 feet down in the snowpack.  Expect to see some natural avalanche activity and whumphing and cracking the next few days until things settle.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2017-12-29
December 29, 2017 at 6:49

Heavy snowfall has been and is currently falling and will continue throught the advisory period with snowfall rates up to an inch an hour.  Avalanche activity is expected to increase during the advisory period.  Storm slabs can be triggered easily by skiers.  Windloading has occured on the SE - N aspects, with extensive windslabs and cornices observed at the higher elevations. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision making are essential in the backcountry today. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-02
January 2, 2018 at 5:48

The snowpack is beginning to heal after a to 2+ ft. deposit of snow across the region last week. Even though the snowpack is getting stronger, there are still multiple persistent weak layers that can be easily triggered causing avalanches.  Be conservative in your decision making and route finding. There's plenty of good snowmobiling and skiing to be had out there if you choose your terrain appropriately.  Dangerous avalanche conditions still exist but are slowly strengthening day by day. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-02
January 2, 2018 at 7:00

The snowpack went through the ringer over the holiday weekend, recieving up to 2ft+ of snow and then some rain/mixed precipitation on top of that.  Even though the snowpack is starting to heal and get stronger, there are multiple persistent weak layers that can be triggered causing an avalanche.  Be conservatice in your decision making and route finding, dangerous avalanche conditions still exist but are slowly strengthening. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-05
January 5, 2018 at 6:48

This week has seen clear skies and gradual improvement in stability with another cycle of surface hoar development on the denser layer from the 12/30 storm (note: first hand inspection, this is not a full on rain crust).  All the new loading of the past two weeks has buried the persistent layer under 2 to 3 feet of snow and even deeper in windloaded areas. Be cautious of this layer as a slide of this depth would be catastrophic.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-05
January 5, 2018 at 6:58

The lack of snow over the past week has given the layers of snow near the surface (storm slabs) a chance to strengthen. Don't let your guard down though...There are still 2 layers deep in the snowpack that can be woken up if triggered.  Even though the snowpack is healing, it's still quietly near a tipping point.  Don't get tempted to test mother nature right now.  Keep a conservative approach to your terrain selection and keep your group in sight. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-09
January 9, 2018 at 6:41

Most of the forecast region received rain over the past couple days.  The rain in most areas has frozen into a firm crust on or near the surface.  Once that crust gets more snow on it, it could be problematic. Rain crusts can make nice sliding surfaces. Let's hope the next storm comes in wet and turns dry. Wet snow will have a much better chance of sticking to that rain crust then a dry slab would. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-09
January 9, 2018 at 6:41

Most of the forecast region received rain over the past couple days.  The rain in most areas has frozen into a firm crust on or near the surface.  Once that crust gets more snow on it, it could be problematic. Rain crusts can make nice sliding surfaces. Let's hope the next storm comes in wet and turns dry. Wet snow will have a much better chance of sticking to that rain crust then a dry slab would. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-12
January 12, 2018 at 6:22

The recent storm has left more than 2 feet of snow in most locations. The new snow fell on top of a couple weak layer resulting in dangerous avalanche conditions.  Travel is not recommended in avalanche terrain.  Storm slabs are usually the weakest in the 24-48 hours after a storm. Yesterday, we found the storm slab was not bonding well to the old snow underneath.  Thank you to Schweitzer Mountain for sponsoring our forecast today! 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-12
January 12, 2018 at 6:22

The recent storm has left more than 2 feet of snow in most locations. The new snow fell on top of a couple weak layer resulting in dangerous avalanche conditions.  Travel is not recommended in avalanche terrain.  Storm slabs are usually the weakest in the 24-48 hours after a storm. Yesterday, we found the storm slab was not bonding well to the old snow underneath.  Thank you to Schweitzer Mountain for sponsoring our forecast today! 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-16
January 16, 2018 at 4:43

The upper above tree-line elevations are still holding storm slabs from the last storm cycle.  Stability tests are showing that the snowpack is strengthening; but careful snowpack evaluation and cautious route finding are required in the high country. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-16
January 16, 2018 at 6:11

Even though the northern panhandle hasn't see snow in a couple days don't get tricked into thinking the snowpack is healed! The problem layers under the surface are alive and well... just waiting for the right trigger. Keep your guard up- Dangerous avalanche conditions still exist! Thank you everyone for the awesome observations recently! They've been really helpful!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-18
January 18, 2018 at 20:58

Significant windloading and recent snowfall from yesterday mornings storm has formed deep windslabs near ridgetops on N, NE, and E aspects near 6000 foot range.  This has increased the load on buried surface hoar about 2 feet down (deeper in windloaded areas).  With the recent snowfall and warmer temperatures yesterday wind slab avalanches will become more reactive to human triggers.  Cautious route finding is key in our current snowpack state.   

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-18
January 18, 2018 at 20:58

Significant windloading and recent snowfall from yesterday mornings storm has formed deep windslabs near ridgetops on N, NE, and E aspects near 6000 foot range.  This has increased the load on buried surface hoar about 2 feet down (deeper in windloaded areas).  With the recent snowfall and warmer temperatures yesterday wind slab avalanches will become more reactive to human triggers.  Cautious route finding is key in our current snowpack state.   

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-23
January 23, 2018 at 6:38

The buried surface hoar layers that has kept us at an elevated avalanche danger rating is still alive and well. Don't let your guard down...in fact, we might see an increase in danger as this next storm arrives and puts a bigger a load on top of the weak layers.  The storm that has arrives looks to strong with the likelyhood of producing up to 2' of snow at upper elevations by Friday. Stay tuned...We'll keep you updated.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-23
January 23, 2018 at 6:56

Snowpack conditions are variable across the advisory region.  Heightened avalanche conditions exist on specific terrain features and require careful evaluation.  Observations of instabilities around the region include: buried surface hoar, windslabs, buried ice crusts with facets, and in some locations still the deep persistent weak layer. Slope specific evaluation is needed before skiing or riding. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-25
January 25, 2018 at 7:10

Over the past 24 hours the mountains have received a generous amount of snow.  Westerly winds, stronger to the north, have been loading new snow.  Temperatures also rose to near or above freezing creating a heavier layer of snow overlying a less dense layer.  This is the primary weak layer of concern, heavy new snow over lighter snow, and was found to be very weak yesterday.  Windloaded new snow could be a concern today.  Travel in avalanche terrain not recommended.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-25
January 25, 2018 at 7:10

Over the past 24 hours the mountains have received a generous amount of snow.  Westerly winds, stronger to the north, have been loading new snow.  Temperatures also rose to near or above freezing creating a heavier layer of snow overlying a less dense layer.  This is the primary weak layer of concern, heavy new snow over lighter snow, and was found to be very weak yesterday.  Windloaded new snow could be a concern today.  Travel in avalanche terrain not recommended.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-25
January 25, 2018 at 22:44

Recent natural, snowmobile and skier avalanches have been observed with the recent storm since Thursday in the forecast area.  Some areas are more reactive than others but we have consistent persistant weak layers in the snowpack across the board.  New storm snow has been reactive 1-2 feet deep with potential to trigger weak layers deeper in the pack.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-26
January 26, 2018 at 6:57

With the previous storm depositing a generous amount of snow and transport speed winds moving that snow around, there has been a lot of loading. We are forecasted to recieve even more snow with gusty winds, adding to this load. Avalanche danger will increase during the forecast period as the weekend storm systems roll through.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-30
January 30, 2018 at 6:30

A new advisory and a new avalanche problem to talk about! Even though buried persistent layers and deep slab instabilities are still a concern, the bigger issue is the precipitation falling on the snowpack right now. Upper elevations are seeing light snow and strong winds while the lower elevations are seeing rain.  Be aware of wind transported snow up high and rain on snow down low.  Based on temperatures, it looks like the rain snow line is at 4,500-5,500 ft.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-01-30
January 30, 2018 at 6:58

Our snowpack continues to gain strength from the past weekend storms, but strong winds came in overnight with new snowfall leading to windslab development.  Todays weather will continue to lend to windslab development. Expect to find windslabs on the northeasterly aspects as well as storm slabs on all aspects above 5000'. Buried weak layers of variable distribution also warrant conservative terrain selection.  Assess the snowpack in each place you plan to ride or slide

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-01
February 1, 2018 at 16:53

In that past 5-7 days we have received steady snowfall, witnessed above freezing temperatures, and endured some rain.  This has created new surface layers and also helped to stabilize some problem layers last week.  Eric revealed two ice crusts in the upper 18 inches that could present problems with enough new snow or windloaded snow.  Normal caution is advised up high but use caution.   Problem weak layers are more likely in northerly aspects on large, steep, exposed and open terrain.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-02
February 2, 2018 at 6:22

It's Groundhog's Day and we are still caught in a time loop of the same three avalanche problems.  Storm slabs, windslabs, and persistent slabs. Expect avalanche danger to increase as we get more snow loading during the day on Friday accompanied by gusty winds and then changing to higher density snow/rain on Friday night.  Assess the terrain at each location by digging down into the snow to identify the layers at your location. Use cautious route-finding and conservative decision-making choices.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-06
February 6, 2018 at 6:50

Since our last advisory, the Selkirks and Cabinets have seen rain and wind. The rain has saturated the lower elevation snowpack while the wind at higher elevations has transported a fresh slab of snow onto leeward slopes. The rain line in most area was around 5000 ft. Be aware of the different snow conditions at different elevations and aspects. Be cautious on wind loaded slopes near ridges. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-06
February 6, 2018 at 7:04

The recent precipitation pattern has injected a lot of heat into the snowpack (here) accompanied by average air temperatues being above freezing for the last four days has led to an unstable snowpack. Overnight loading of an additional 0.5 to 1" of snow water equivalent (3 to 7" of snow) has further destabilized the pack. It is important to pay attention to these spring like conditions and not become complacent because the snowpack is stable at lower elevations.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-09
February 9, 2018 at 6:58

The forecast is back to winter-like temperatures, which will help lock up all the moisture we've been seeing in the pack this week and increase the stability.  Variable amounts of snow (1-5") fell across the forecast region last night, creating the potential for windslab formation. It is important as backcountry users that we evaluate the snow and terrain carefully to identify these areas.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-09
February 9, 2018 at 7:03

With temperatures mostly above freezing since February 5th in the mountains  most of our precipitation has been rain from 6300 feet down until last night.  The pack has firmed up with about 3-4 inches of snow ontop of an melt freeze icecrust that is more prominent  below 6000 feet.  Extreme upper elevations have a more dense snow surface with lighter powder on top.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-13
February 13, 2018 at 6:51

Cold temperatures and strong winds have driven some change in the snowpack. The cold temperatures over the past 72 hours have frozen the top of the snowpack. It's pretty locked up and won't change to much until we see warmer temperatures or more snow. Meanwhile...the strong winds have transported a fresh wind slab on to windward slopes.  These newly formed wind slabs are sitting on older wind slabs that are capable of breaking off in the form of an avalanche

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-13
February 13, 2018 at 6:59

The cold front that has swept through the region has done a good job of locking up the snowpack and increasing stability.  The gusty winds we've been having created isolated windslabs on leeward aspects near our ridgelines.  Heads up for the new storm coming in starting tonight, with the potential for over a foot of new snow to fall on a potentially slick bed surface.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-16
February 16, 2018 at 6:59

The weekend is about to roll in with a bang weather wise.  Going into Friday morning with an overall fairly stable snowpack, but the snow accumulation is going to ramp up throughout the day today and not stop until Sunday night.  Storm totals could exceed 4 feet in areas and will be accompanied by strong winds.  Expect the avalanche danger to increase throughout Saturday and Sunday.  Significant snowfall and strong winds are two of the avalanche red flags. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-16
February 16, 2018 at 7:31

Currently 10 inches of recent storm snow sitting atop an ice crust.  There is some wind affect and slight suncrust on top of the current surface.  A series of storms will be rolling in with breezy conditions forming wind slabs and loading on Noreasterly aspectsAvalanche danger will be on the rise throughout the weekend with the brunt of the storm coming in Saturday.  Red flags will be heavy precipitation and winds.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-20
February 20, 2018 at 6:53

After a week of good snow and strong winds we'll be hanging out in a cold high pressure for the next 24 hours. There was a lot of reverse loading above treeline and near ridges. Areas that are normally thought of as leeward slopes may have newly formed wind slabs on them.  We're getting initial information about a snowmobile triggered avalanche in Echo bowl yesterday. No details yet... Stay safe out there!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-20
February 20, 2018 at 6:57

The storm slabs and wind slabs from the President's Weekend storms are still working on stabilizing after such a big and rapid load.  Most areas are resting on a layer of weak facets and the slick rain crust sliding surface. When headed into the backcountry, use careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision making. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-22
February 22, 2018 at 18:54

Snowpack is consolidating with light powder on the surface where it is not wind affected.  Assess upper elevation ridgetops and wind affected areas greater than 35 degrees as it is highly variable.  

Advisory
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February 22, 2018 at 18:54

Snowpack is consolidating with light powder on the surface where it is not wind affected.  Assess upper elevation ridgetops and wind affected areas greater than 35 degrees as it is highly variable.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-02-27
February 27, 2018 at 6:52

The new snow across the Selkirk and Cabinet mountains have made for some powdery conditions! Be aware of soft slab potential near and above treeline. The light snow on the surface isn't a big concern right now, but we're looking at 15-20'' more by this weekend. As more snow falls, your internal 'red light' should be getting brighter. Expect the avalanche danger to increase over the next couple days.

Advisory
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February 27, 2018 at 7:00

The region recieved a substantial amount of new snow and high winds over the weekend, over 20 inches in most places. We saw extensive windslab development in the higher elevations. Yesterday was a brief respite from those winds, but overnight they picked up to transport speed again and will be accompanied by another shot of precipitation today.  Expect sensitive windslabs on leeward aspects and allow time for the storm slabs to stabilize.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-01
March 1, 2018 at 21:07

Stability issues from wind effected snow will be your main concern today.  Mountains picked up a couple inches.  Temperatures in the mountains remained below freezing and surface snow will be easily transported by the forecast winds today and tonight.  New snow is expected and this will also add to stress on windloaded aspects.  You'll find good traveling in most terrain but remain cautious of steep lee aspects with cornice formation and sparse vegetation to protect from triggering unstable wind slabs.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-02
March 2, 2018 at 6:53

A series of small storms has been tracking across the Silver Valley, depositing a few inches yesterday and last night.  The smaller amounts in these storms accompanied by steady moderate temperatures have allowed these layers to bond, but have provided new fuel for windloading each day.  Expect windslab formation at the ridgelines. 

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-02
March 2, 2018 at 6:54

Stability issues from wind effected snow will be your main concern today.  Mountains picked up a couple inches.  Temperatures in the mountains remained below freezing and surface snow will be easily transported by the forecast winds today and tonight.  New snow is expected and this will also add to stress on windloaded aspects.  You'll find good traveling in most terrain but remain cautious of steep lee aspects with cornice formation and sparse vegetation to protect from triggering unstable wind slabs.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-06
March 6, 2018 at 6:20

The Cabinets and Selkirk mountains have been getting light density snow over the past 48 hours.  Scroll down to the avalanche problems to see what we're saying about the avalanche danger.  IPAC sends it's condolences to the friends and families of the avalanche victims in Washington state.  We're sad to report, 6 people have lost their lives in avalanches in Washington over the past week.  Know what avalanche terrain is and practice safe travel techniques.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-06
March 6, 2018 at 6:57

Small storms, light winds, and mild temperatures have helped stabilized the upper snowpack this week.  Caution is still needed in steep, high consequence terrain where loose dry avalanches are a possibility.  The persistent weak layer is still showing its face in some locations, so it is important that you check your location by digging down.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-09
March 9, 2018 at 6:31

A winter storm has produced snow, rain and wind across the forecast area. 6-8'' of snow has fallen above 4800', but has been moved around with the wind.  The winds were primarily out of the SW which means the E-N faces could have significant wind loading. Expect the storm slab at higher elevations to be reactive. Natural avalanches are possible and human triggered avalanches are likely on slopes steeper than 35 degrees. Make good decisions and travel safely.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-09
March 9, 2018 at 7:01

The storm that was called off ended up materializing with 6 -8" of heavy, dense snow and gusty SW winds. Watch for windslabs and storm slabs at the high elevations, and windslab development to continue throughout the day. Expect to see loose-wet avalanche activity in the lower elevations today and on the southern aspects as the sun hits them tomorrow.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-13
March 13, 2018 at 6:21

The snowpack is going through a big change right now.  Spring is here...at least for a couple days. The warm temperatures have decreased the stability in the upper portions of the snowpack. We'll hit the climax of this warm weather today (possibly 50 degrees at 5000').  Natural avalanches will be possible today and human triggered avalanches likely. Make wise travel choices today and stay away from solar aspects especially under rock outcroppings.    

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-13
March 13, 2018 at 6:52

Sunshine and warm temperatures will destabilize the upper portion of the snowpack throughout the day.  Avoid areas where loose wet slides have the potential for pushing you into terrain traps.  And pay attention above, cornices become weaker as the weather warms.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-16
March 16, 2018 at 5:40

Consolidated snowpack with firm sun and raincrust with 1 inch of heavy snow on the surface.  Watch for cornice releases which have been the triggers for recent avalanches.  

Advisory
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March 16, 2018 at 6:29

Spring skiing and spring avalanche problems? Visit the SW -S- SE solar aspects. Heads up for roller balls, pinwheels, cornice falls, and natural wet slides as the day warms up to indicate the instability is rising.  Winter skiing and winter avalanche problems? Visit the NE - N - NW aspects. Heads up for lingering windslabs and always be checking for the persistent weak layers.  

Advisory
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March 20, 2018 at 6:23

 Sunday night, a quick moving storm left 9-11'' of snow above 4500'. The snow fell on a firm frozen surface, giving it a nice plane to slide on.  As the new snow settles, it will become a stiffer slab and potentially produce larger avalanches. If temperatures rise in the next couple days (as they're forecasted to do), be aware of a increasing avalanche danger.  Wet slab avalanches are likely. Spring snowpack is here! Get it while it's frozen!

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-20
March 20, 2018 at 6:38

Isolated windslabs formed Sunday night and yesterday morning: look for pillowy looking snow.  Use caution in steep, unsupported terrain on the E-NE-N aspects where windslabs will still be lingering today.  As the temperatures go up with the sunshine today, expect to see pinwheels, rollerballs, and loose wet slides.  

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-23
March 23, 2018 at 6:50

The buried surface hoar layers from the past two weeks are starting to become active with the new, heavy loading we are getting.  Watch the temperatures and keep an eye out for rollerballs; the potential for wet slides will increase throughout the day as the temperatures goes above freezing at lower elevations or the sun peaks through. Also watch for isolated pockets of windslabs that formed late last night and expect more to form throughout the weekend.

Advisory
Click here to see the full advisory for 2018-03-23
March 23, 2018 at 6:59

Over the past 24 hours we've seen a big addition of weight to the snowpack in the form of rain.  Rain, not only adds a lot of weight to the snowpack but it also breaks down the structure of the snowpack.  Not a good thing for snow stability. The good news is...cold temperatures will soon start to freeze up the snowpack, making it stronger. Don't trust the snowpack yet, but it should trend in the right direction soon.

Advisory

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