THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON April 3, 2019 @ 6:30 am
Avalanche Advisory published on April 2, 2019 @ 6:30 am
Issued by Melissa Hendrickson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets
St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

bottom line

We have entered a nice spring pattern with freezing temperatures at night and warm ups during the day. Expect to find Low avalanche danger in the morning and for it to rise as the mercury rises on the sunny aspects. Watch for loose wet slides as the day heats up and avoid any glide crack or cornice areas. Get in and get out of avalanche terrain early. 

How to read the advisory

Selkirks/Cabinets
St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

How to read the advisory

We have entered a nice spring pattern with freezing temperatures at night and warm ups during the day. Expect to find Low avalanche danger in the morning and for it to rise as the mercury rises on the sunny aspects. Watch for loose wet slides as the day heats up and avoid any glide crack or cornice areas. Get in and get out of avalanche terrain early. 

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
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Expect loose wet slides to be the main concern as the temperature rises. Overnight temperatures will continue to dip below freezing and lock up the snowpack during the night. Mornings will have good stability until the sun starts blazing. When you start seeing rollerballs or the snow starts getting sloppy, head to the colder side or out of avalanche terrain.

Avalanche Problem 2: Glide
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We continue to get reports of glide cracks opening up around the forecast areas.  Direct sun and warm temperatures cause free water to lubricate the underlying bed surface and cause the glide cracks to open. Watch for large cracks on steep slopes and do your best to avoid lingering around underneath them. 

Avalanche Problem 3: Cornice
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Prolonged warm temperatures continue to weaken cornices. This problem is easy to mitigate: don't hang out under them and continue to give them a wide berth on the ridge tops. Easy peasy. If you see a cleave or a crevasse-like crack where it is breaking away, definitly pay close attention to where you (or your 4 legged friend) is walking.

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Spokane NWS
For 2000 ft. to 4000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Sunny Slight chance showers Showers likely
Temperatures: 56 deg. F. 36 deg. F. 49 deg. F.
Wind Direction: NE E SW
Wind Speed: 8 5-10 7-9
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. .10 rain in.
For 4000 ft. to 6000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Mostly sunny Slight chance snow showers and breezy Snow showers And breezy
Temperatures: 42 deg. F. 31 deg. F. 38 deg. F.
Wind Direction: E E SW
Wind Speed: 9-14 15-18 16-21
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 1-3 in.
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.