THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON April 6, 2019 @ 6:52 am
Avalanche Advisory published on April 5, 2019 @ 6:52 am
Issued by Kevin Davis - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets

bottom line

Great sliding conditions exist out there right now.  The lack of an overnight freeze may have things slighty slushy, say that six times fast, but above 6,ooo feet the snow is more supportive.  You'll also find 4-6 inches of powder on northerly aspects above 6,000 feet so make your mission to seek the fresh before its gone.

How to read the advisory

Selkirks/Cabinets

How to read the advisory

Great sliding conditions exist out there right now.  The lack of an overnight freeze may have things slighty slushy, say that six times fast, but above 6,ooo feet the snow is more supportive.  You'll also find 4-6 inches of powder on northerly aspects above 6,000 feet so make your mission to seek the fresh before its gone.

1. Low

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Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

Rain is in the forecast today and with the lack of an overnight freeze and warming temperatures today you might see or trigger some loose wet slides in steeper terrain.   The new snow from Wednesday is well bonded to the snow beneath but it could create some wet sloughs as it absorbs rain or warms up excessively.  We foud the snow on a south aspect to be near isothermal meaning it will break down more quickly to heat input.   

advisory discussion

This is our last forecast of the season.  If you go out in the mountains this weekend you'll notice the difference in the snow conditions as your aspect changes.  We even found powder snow on a west aspect.  Southerly aspects were heating up and you'll have to be aware of rotten snow that could suck you in.  A good way to travel right now is by ridgetops where you can easily sample the snow on multiple aspects.  If it feels good, dive in, if not, get out.  Ben and I had a great slide down this ridge back to our sleds on the Keeler road.  The snow got less supportive as we descended.  The wind helped us out yesterday and kept the snow surface from heating up and getting too manky.  Thanks to everyone who submitted observations, came to our classes, attended Pit Chats, thanks to the Friends of IPAC.  It's all about creating a community of people that enjoy getting out in the mountains in the winter.  If we keep building that awareness we'll pass on good safe travel habits to the next generation.  We'll post the spring touring tips next week to wrap things up for 2019.

recent observations

I was out in the Cabinet Mountains with Ben Bernall yesterday and we had a great time touring up around Benning Mountain at the head end of Rattle Creek.  We saw some large and small loose wet slides that ran on steep southerly aspects.  Most came from exposed steep rocky areas.

 

 

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

 

Today to Saturday night: Several rounds of precipitation are
in store as a series of waves pass through. This will be mixed
with a risk for thunderstorms, some mountain snow, and breezy
conditions. The first wave passes this morning and early afternoon
with an area of precipitation lifting across the Columbia Basin
and northeastern mountains, before exiting through north Idaho. A
brief lull is expected before the second wave moves in and spreads
showers from west-southwest to northeast between mid-afternoon
and evening, along with the threat of thunderstorms.
Weather observations from the Region
0600 temperature: 35 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 44 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: SE
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 5 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: NA mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 0 inches
Total snow depth: 105 inches
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.