THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 16, 2019 @ 6:43 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 15, 2019 @ 6:43 am
Issued by Melissa Hendrickson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

bottom line

The weather looks like we've solidly hit spring weather for the extended forecast!  The sun beating down on the snow will make the instability increase  through the daytime due to the potential for wet avalanches.  Beat this by playing the game of aspects.  Hit your SE-S-W aspects in the morning before they heat up and head to the North as the day progresses.  And don't forget your sunscreen!

How to read the advisory

St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

How to read the advisory

The weather looks like we've solidly hit spring weather for the extended forecast!  The sun beating down on the snow will make the instability increase  through the daytime due to the potential for wet avalanches.  Beat this by playing the game of aspects.  Hit your SE-S-W aspects in the morning before they heat up and head to the North as the day progresses.  And don't forget your sunscreen!

1. Low

?

Above Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

?

Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    Certain
    Very Likely
    Likely
    Possible
    Unlikely
  • Size ?
    Historic
    Very Large
    Large
    Small

This danger will increase with increasing temperature.  Mitigate your exposure by starting on the SE-S-W aspects in the morning, then moving to the shaded north in the afternoons.  And don't let the breakable sun crusts ruin your day! Loose-wet slides are often small, slow and harmless, but getting caught in one can entrain you and carry you to places you don't want to be.  If you start seeing pinwheels and rollerballs, it's time to head around to the dark side!

recent observations

We travelled to Glidden Ridge yesterday and checked out the conditions on all the aspects.  Above 5000' we found powder on all aspects, although it was over a breakable crust on the E-S-W sides.  By the time backcountry enthusiasts hit the hills today, I expect that surface powder to have been sun affected and we'll start a melt-freeze cycle on the SE-S-W aspects.  As the weather warms up through the weekend, maybe even expect the north to become a little less fluffy.  Expect the lower elevations approaches to get a little soggy, with daytime temperatures in the 40s!   We found a couple of lingering wind slabs yesterday, but not enough for it to make the top watch outs for today.  Our pit tests showed good stability on all aspects today, we didn't get as much snow as the north country did in Tuesday's storm.  

Remember that just because the forecast says green, doesn't mean you can abandon all safe avalanche travel and practices!  Use your training, commorn sense, and keep a heads up for unstable conditions.  Process all that information to ulitimately draw your conclusion as to wether you are going to ride or slide something.  Have a safe weekend. 

  

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Spokane NWS
For 2000 ft. to 4000 ft.
Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Patchy Freezing Fog then Partly Sunny Mostly Cloudy then Patchy Freezing Fog Patchy Freezing Fog then Mostly Sunny
Temperatures: 40 deg. F. 27 deg. F. 45 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SW SW S
Wind Speed: Light Light 5
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
For 4000 ft. to 6000 ft.
Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Partly Sunny Partly Cloudy Increasing Clouds
Temperatures: 30 deg. F. 34 deg. F. 36 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SW SW SE
Wind Speed: 11-14 8-10 10-14
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.