THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 16, 2019 @ 7:39 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 15, 2019 @ 7:39 am
Issued by Eric Morgan - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets

bottom line

With cool nights and daytime temps hovering at the freezing level and sunny days, solar aspects will be most affected towards the middle of the day warming the upper snowpack especially on steeper slopes where the sun angle is the greatest.  

How to read the advisory

Selkirks/Cabinets

How to read the advisory

With cool nights and daytime temps hovering at the freezing level and sunny days, solar aspects will be most affected towards the middle of the day warming the upper snowpack especially on steeper slopes where the sun angle is the greatest.  

2. Moderate

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Above Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

2. Moderate

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Near Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

2. Moderate

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Below Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
    Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Storm Slab
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Tuesdays storm slab is a solid 12 inches that sits ontop of a suncrust on solar aspects and otherwise on consolidated snow.  At Roman Nose in the Selkirks yesterday this slab was only reactive in the middle of the day on slopes >37 degrees when the sun was most intense.  Use caution when hitting convex rollovers on steep exposed terrain in the heat of the day.  Otherwise it was holding pretty tight on all other aspects we toured on.  

Avalanche Problem 2: Persistent Slab
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I am suspecting that there is some buried surface hoar in some areas a foot down where it formed last weekend during our high pressure.  I did not find it in the Roman Nose area but know that it has been seen in other areas in our zone.  A quick hasty pit or sled cutting will help one identify this as you are out there in your travels.  Just something to be aware of since it is variable.  Look for it more in sheltered areas where the winds that came ahead of Tuesdays storm out of the SE, S, SW did not affect the old surface.  

recent observations

In the Selkirk Range yesterday we found stable conditions in all of the Roman Nose Lakes area with soft powdery snow on a consolidated snowpack.  On the South and Easterly aspects the sun was working on softening things up at 6800 feet but the cooler winds seemed to be preserving the surface for the time being.  I kicked off a small slab in an area where the sun had more effect but overall things were not effected.  However with todays forecast and through the weekend I would expects some of the storm slabs to get effected by the sun and become more vulnerable during the heat of the day.  

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
weather summary

Partly sunny with highs in the low 30's, SW winds around 11 becoming NE overnight.  Tomorrow will be sunny again with high near 34 and NE wind around 8 switching SW in the afternoon.  Temperatures will continue to increase through the weekend into the 40's with nighttime temperatures in the high 20's.  This pattern will continue through the week creating freeze/thaw snow conditions.  

Weather observations from the Region
0600 temperature: 18 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 26 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: SW
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: 10 mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 0 inches
Total snow depth: 115 inches
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.