THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 20, 2019 @ 6:32 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 19, 2019 @ 6:32 am
Issued by Jeff Thompson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

Selkirks/Cabinets

bottom line

Spring conditions are here in full force! We've had many reports of wet avalanche activity across the region.  Expect to see the avalanche danger increase throughout the day. As air temperatures rise so does the avalanche danger. Be particularly careful on solar aspects (E-S-W). I anticipate seeing a increase in avalanche activity over the the next 48-72 hours.  Enjoy the sun but keep it safe!

How to read the advisory

Selkirks/Cabinets

How to read the advisory

Spring conditions are here in full force! We've had many reports of wet avalanche activity across the region.  Expect to see the avalanche danger increase throughout the day. As air temperatures rise so does the avalanche danger. Be particularly careful on solar aspects (E-S-W). I anticipate seeing a increase in avalanche activity over the the next 48-72 hours.  Enjoy the sun but keep it safe!

3. Considerable

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Above Treeline
Dangerous avalanche conditions. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision-making essential.

3. Considerable

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Near Treeline
Dangerous avalanche conditions. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision-making essential.

2. Moderate

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Below Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
    Dangerous avalanche conditions. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision-making essential.
Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
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The wet loose avalanche problem will increase throughout the day.  As water melts and moves it way through the snowpack, it breaks down the strength of the pack. Try to be on avalanche prone slopes before the daily melt starts. If the surface is soft and wet, it's probably to late.  The good thing about the Spring snowpack is, it gives you big signs of instability. keep your avy eyes open and listen to the signs that mother nature is telling you. 

Avalanche Problem 2: Wet Slab
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The likelyhood of big wet slab avalanches will be increasing over the next couple of days. As free flowing water percolates into the snowpack it makes midpack layers more unstable and susceptible to slab avalanches. Be aware of your location today. Stay away from runout zones or near midslope rocks. Midslope rocks heat up quickly and allow freeflowing water to drain into the snowpack.  I expect to see large natural avalanches in the next couple of days.

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
Weather observations from the Region
0600 temperature: 27 deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: 45 deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours: NE
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: calm mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: 14 mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: 0 inches
Total snow depth: 80 inches
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Spokane NWS
For 2000 ft. to 4000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Sun Sun Sun
Temperatures: 56 deg. F. 36 deg. F. 60 deg. F.
Wind Direction: NE NE NE
Wind Speed: 5-7 5-7 5-7
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
For 4000 ft. to 6000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Sun Sun Sun
Temperatures: 49 deg. F. 34 deg. F. 50 deg. F.
Wind Direction: NE NE NE
Wind Speed: 5-10 5-10 5-10
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.