THIS AVALANCHE ADVISORY EXPIRED ON March 6, 2019 @ 6:46 am
Avalanche Advisory published on March 5, 2019 @ 6:46 am
Issued by Melissa Hendrickson - Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center

St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

bottom line

The current challenge is to find good snow that hasn't been hammered by the winds over the last week.  To avoid the wind slab problem on our SW - N aspects, search out cold powder that is lingering in the timbered areas that have been protected from the winds. 

How to read the advisory

St. Regis Basin/Silver Valley

How to read the advisory

The current challenge is to find good snow that hasn't been hammered by the winds over the last week.  To avoid the wind slab problem on our SW - N aspects, search out cold powder that is lingering in the timbered areas that have been protected from the winds. 

2. Moderate

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Above Treeline
Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.

1. Low

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Near Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

1. Low

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Below Treeline
Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
    Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern.
Avalanche Problem 1: Wind Slab
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It has been a cold and windy past couple of days!  Over the weekend the winds came from the North and the East so expect to find lingering wind slabs on the westerly aspects.  Be vigilant for wind slabs near the ridges and crossloading in gullies and other terrain features that could trap blowing snow.  

Avalanche Problem 2: Persistent Slab
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    Certain
    Very Likely
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Our persistent weak layer frienemy.  While they are still lurking down in the pack about a meter in most locations, they have not been reactive in tests in a while now, so the probablity of triggering them is getting more and more unlikely.  

recent observations

With generally stable riding conditions it's a good time to do a self assessment on our own safe practices.  Check over your equipment and make sure it is in good working order.  Have you put your probe together in a while?  What are the human factors that I tend to fall prey to?  How can I overcome that weakness and be a better partner for my group?  Not sure how human factors play into decision making in avalanche terrain?  Then join me for Powder Hour with the Spokane Mountaineers at the Gastropub in Spokane on Wednesday night at 5:30!  Details on the events page.  How about that smooth but shameless plug!!

Weather and CURRENT CONDITIONS
Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Produced in partnership with the Spokane NWS
For 2000 ft. to 4000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Mostly Sunny Chance Snow Snow Likely
Temperatures: 32 deg. F. 24 deg. F. 32 deg. F.
Wind Direction: E E E
Wind Speed: 8-11 11-13 11-14
Expected snowfall: 0 in. <1" in. 1" in.
For 4000 ft. to 6000 ft.
Tuesday Tuesday Night Wednesday
Weather: Mostly Sunny Chance Snow Snow Likely and Patchy Blowing Snow
Temperatures: 21 deg. F. 17 deg. F. 21 deg. F.
Wind Direction: SE E E
Wind Speed: 9-13 15, G23 11-16
Expected snowfall: 0 in. <1" in. 1-3 in.
Disclaimer

Avalanche conditions change for better or worse continually. Backcountry travelers should be prepared to assess current conditions for themselves, plan their routes of travel accordingly, and never travel alone. Backcountry travelers can reduce their exposure to avalanche hazards by utilizing timbered trails and ridge routes and by avoiding open and exposed terrain with slope angles of 30 degrees or more. Backcountry travelers should carry the necessary avalanche rescue equipment such as a shovel, avalanche probe or probe ski poles, a rescue beacon and a well-equipped first aid kit.  For a recorded version of the Avalanche Advisory call (208)765-7323.